Image result for WinePairing wine and food is the focus of this part of our wine 101 guide…
The taste of a wine can improve or worsen depending on the food that you drink it with. There are only a few combinations which really do not work, however, by learning a little you can bring the best out of both the wine and the food.
There are two basic and simple approaches involved; one is contrast, where the wine is different in character to the food, yet still complimentary, and the other is complimentary, where the wine and food work together through a similar trait (such as sweetness or acidic). Either works equally well, but which to apply varies on the type of food being served. Regional combinations are worth paying attention to as food originating from a particular region or country will often pair well with the local wines, as they have both evolved to complement one another. The foods that are hardest to combine with wines are egg dishes, acidic foods, and hot and spicy selections. There are no specific rules or recommendations for these, and it’s really a case of hit and miss. Personal experimentation is necessary if you insist on pairing wine with such foods.
Here are some examples of wine and food pairings: beef is best paired with Cabernet Sauvignon, Burgundy, Bordeaux, Zinfandel or Pinot Noir; lamb pairs well with Bordeaux, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Gris, or Medoc; poultry served with a light sauce pairs well with Chardonnay, Chablis or White Burgundy; poultry served with a heavy or spicy sauce goes well Zinfandel, Pinot Noir or Beaujolais; fish is best served with Sauvignon Blanc or White Burgundy.However, though these are said to be classic pairings, that doesn’t mean that you’ll necessarily like all of them. Keep in mind that your palate is unique to you, so if you don’t like a combination, don’t use it. It’s important to also remember that some people only drink one kind of wine, no matter what food is being served. So, if you’re entertaining a guest who only drinks white wine, it’s not advisable to insist on them drinking a particular red wine just because you think it matches the food well. You can recommend a certain variety, but the final decision about what they drink should be up to your guests.

Post Comment